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The genes that determine the color of the eyes

The genes that determine the color of the eyes

A study by the University of Queensland's Molecular Bioscience and the Queensland Institute of Medical Research has shown that there is not a single gene responsible for a particular eye color.

A study by the University of Queensland's Molecular Bioscience and the Queensland Institute of Medical Research has shown that there is not a single gene responsible for a particular eye color.
In contrast, it has been found that more genes determine the color of an individual's eyes, although some have a greater influence than others.
"Each individual has two types of genes, one inherited from the father and one from the mother. These two types of genes may be the same or different" - says Dr Rick Sturm, who led the research.
"Until now, the transmission of eye color from parents to children is considered to be a mere Mendeelian recessive change, in other words, goat eyes are dominant over blue eyes.

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Therefore, a person with two types of genes, one for goats and the other for blue, should have goat eyes and only two blue eyes could produce blue eyes.
But the pattern of eye color inheritance using a single gene is not enough to explain the frequency with which certain colors appear in humans. Instead, we consider that there are two main genes, one that controls the appearance of goat or blue eyes, and the other that controls the appearance of green eyes.
There are also less important genes that play a role in changing the parent-child exchange.