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Australian parents are breaking up at the baby pigs

Australian parents are breaking up at the baby pigs

One in four Australian parents regularly break up with their children to get money with which they then pay for various goods and services, from buying daily bread to going to luxury holidays, support the results of a study released Wednesday. Reuters consulted by Rompres.

One in four Australian parents regularly break up with their children to get money with which they then pay for various goods and services, from buying daily bread to going to luxury holidays, support the results of a study released Wednesday. Reuters consulted by Rompres.
Among parents, mothers are twice as dangerous to the economies of their children as their fathers, 35% of them acknowledging their crime, compared to only 16% of the fathers. But nonetheless, 9 out of 10 Australian parents still think they are setting a good example for the child in terms of saving and investing money.
This study was conducted by Bankwest management company on a representative sample of 400 parents or legal guardians of children under 17 years.


"I am also guilty of this crime," admitted Paul Vivian, one of the Bankwest representatives for Reuters. "The moment you run out of money, as a parent you know you can always rely on one last financial resource ... and this is tricky for the little ones. However, my wife always makes sure that I will return this money and with interest," he said. he added.
Of the parents who admitted that they broke up with the pigs, more than half said they used the money to make daily purchases such as bread, milk or gasoline.
Another 20% of them explained that they needed money to pay bills for water, electricity or other utilities. And for those wondering how much money can be hidden in a piggy bank, 16% of the acre parents gave the big break and used the money to make holidays or buy cars.
These statistical data follow another "more serious" study conducted by the Reserve Bank of Australia, according to which, over the past three years, Australians have tended to spend more than they earned on wages. On average, according to the same source, an Australian saves only 2.9% of his annual income ... so robbing from pigs sometimes becomes a necessity.
Rompres
June 22, 2006