Information

Varicella in pregnancy

Varicella in pregnancy

Prevention of varicella in pregnancy


Prevention of varicella in pregnancy
Pregnant women who have not had varicella or have not been vaccinated against varicella-zoster virus should avoid contact with exposed or possibly infected persons. A 'quarantine' of the future mother is established, in that she must avoid contact with the possibly infected person for at least 3 weeks.
If during this time, the person did not develop the disease, it does not present a danger to the future mother.
It is quite difficult for the pregnant woman to avoid contacting the virus, because the disease is contagious before the specific rash, so the person in question does not even know she has the disease.
In this context, it is recommended to avoid large agglomerations (malls, cinemas, supermarkets, medical clinics, public transport, etc.), especially in the context of varicella epidemics (late winter and early spring).
Prospective mothers should know that it is important to ward off people with shingles, even if they have chickenpox in childhood, because contact with these people can cause reactivation of the virus in the body (which remains confined to certain nerve-lymph node structures. nervous). In this case, mild forms of varicella or shingles may recur.
Any mother who has children at home, is not vaccinated against varicella and still wants a child, should vaccinate all children in the family around the age of 12 months (this is also recommended for children who attend nurseries or kindergartens).
Due to the fact that the vaccine contains a live attenuated virus, there is a very small chance that it will be transmitted from the vaccinated person to another person (3 cases have been reported to 21 million vaccinations). This cannot be considered a real risk and does not contravene the vaccination of the population at risk.
Herpes zoster in pregnancy
Herpes zoster is quite rare in pregnant women. The condition appears in most cases in immunocompromised adults, in the elderly and in people with serious associated diseases (neoplasms, cytostatic treatments, HIV-AIDS, etc.).
Even if the disease occurs during pregnancy, it is often mild and does not affect the normal development of the fetus (due to the fact that the virus remains confined to the nerve ganglia and the corresponding nerve threads and does not pass into the blood to be transmitted to the fetus ).